FAQ

Crisis situations can lead to many questions. This page has collected a number of questions and answers from across the Danish authorities.

Gå til spørgsmål og svar på Dansk

Below you find answers to frequently asked questions. If you have further questions, we recommend that you contact the relevant authority which you will find here: Contact.

Energy supply

The situation in Ukraine is constantly changing and raises, among other things, many questions about the energy supply. The Danish Energy Agency has compiled the most frequently asked questions, which the agency updates regularly. Please note, that the FAQ-section is only available in Danish.

FAQ on energy supply in Danish (ens.dk)

Energy prices in Europe are already high, one of the reasons being the energy markets respond to the current situation and expectations for the future. However, it is likely that the supply situation will further affect energy prices in Europe.

When gas prices rise, it could affect the price of electricity. Thus, consumers may be affected by both higher gas and electricity prices. Further, the general instability in the markets affects the price of oil as well.

Although there is no energy crisis right now, the Danish Energy Agency would like to encourage everyone to save energy, which you can do by taking the measures listed below:

  • Lower the temperature in the household
  • Set the thermostats the same
  • Draw curtains for the evening and night

You can find more information in Danish at SparEnergi.dk.

Residence and asylum in Denmark

Yes. The Danish Migration Authorities have published questions and answers in Ukrainian. Follow this link:

nyidanmark.dk

You can be granted a temporary residence permit under the law on temporary residence permits for displaced persons from Ukraine (the Special Act), if you are staying in Denmark, and you are either a Ukrainian citizen or recognized as a refugee in Ukraine.

Read more about residence permit to a person in Denmark displaced from Ukraine (nyidanmark.dk)

You can also be granted a residence permit, if you are a close family member to a person in Denmark, who has been granted a residence permit under the Special Act.

Read more about residence permit to a family member to person in Denmark displaced from Ukraine (nyidanmark.dk)

You can also be granted a residence permit if you are displaced from Ukraine and staying on the Faroe Islands.

Read more about residence permit under the Special Act at the Faroe Islands (nyidanmark.dk)

At the pages you can read more about which requirements you must fulfil and what type of residence permit you can get.

The Immigration Service has made a webpage describing the terms of your stay in Denmark if you have applied for a residence permit in Denmark and are waiting for an answer.

The guidance is mainly aimed at applicants in Denmark, and among other things concerns the terms for health care, housing, work and travels out of Denmark.

Go to the site relevant for you waiting for an answer (nyidanmark.dk)

In order to have a visa-free stay as an Ukrainian citizen you must have a biometric passport issued after 12 January 2015.

If you have a passport issued before 12 January 2015 it is not biometric, and therefore you need to have a short-term visa to enter Denmark. Read more about this in the question/answer further down at this page.

If you are travelling visa-free, you can normally enter Denmark if you meet the following basic conditions:

  • You have a valid passport or other form of valid travel document.
    As an Ukrainian citizen you must have a biometric passport issued after 12 January 2015 in order to be visa-free. If you have a passport issued before 12 January 2015 it is not biometric, and therefore you need to have a short-term visa to enter Denmark.
    The passport or travel document must be valid for three months past the intended date of departure from the Schengen area. Moreover, the passport or travel document must have been issued within the past 10 years.
  • You have the necessary means to pay for your stay and return trip. What will be considered as necessary funds depends on the length of your stay and whether you will stay at a hotel or in a privately owned home with family or friends. As a general rule, you must have at your disposal approx. DKK 350 per day. A smaller amount may be accepted if you are staying in a privately owned home and your host will cover all the costs. If you are staying at a hotel, you must have a greater amount at your disposal, approx. DKK 500 per day.
  • You can substantiate, and, to the required extent, document the purpose of your stay in Denmark. The purpose can e.g. be a stay with friends or family or a tourist stay.
  • You are not registered as an undesirable in the Schengen Information System (SIS II).
  • You have not been expelled by court from Denmark and been banned from re-entering.
  • You are not listed on UN or EU sanction lists.

These conditions apply at the time you enter and stay in Denmark or another Schengen country. It is important that you are able to document at all times that you have the necessary funds to pay for your stay and return trip. If you do not meet these conditions, you can be refused entry at the border.

You also have the possibility to apply for a residence permit under the Special Act.

There is no requirement to your housing, if you are in Denmark on a vise free stay. However, you must still meet the requirements for a visa free stay. Read more about this in the question above.

If you are travelling visa-free or on a short term visa, you may stay in the Schengen region for a maximum of 90 days in any 180-day period. The 90 days can be used either for one long stay or several shorter stays.

The Immigration Service recommends that you use a calendar to count days from the date of entry up to and including the date you leave the country. Note: Both the entry day and the exit day count towards the 90 days in any 180-day period – regardless of the time of day you enter or exit the country. It is always your own responsibility to be aware of how long you are allowed to stay in Denmark. Read more about maximum stay periods (nyidanmark.dk).

This means that you cannot enter Denmark if you have already stayed 90 days in another Schengen country, for example Germany or Sweden. If you have resided in another Schengen country on a residence permit, it is not counted as part of the 90 days.

If you are in Denmark on a visa-free stay for example a private visit to family and you are not able to leave Denmark within 90 days, which is the allowed visa-free stay, you can apply to have your stay extended to cover up to 90 days more.

The same applies if you stay in Denmark on a short term visa, and you are not able to leave Denmark within the allowed days of your visa.

You can submit an application for extension in the Immigration Service’ Citizen Service. You must book an appointment, before you show up in the Citizen Service.

Read more about where the Immigration Service’ Citizen Service is located and how to book an appointment (nyidanmark.dk).

Read more about the application and the requirements you must meet in order to be granted an extension of your stay (nyidanmark.dk).

You can also apply for a residence permit under the Special Act on displaced persons from Ukraine, if you wish to remain in Denmark. Read more under the question above 'Who can obtain a residence permit under the Special Act on displaced persons from Ukraine?'

If you as an Ukrainian citizen do not have a biometric passport, you must have a short stay visa in order to enter Denmark.

You must normally meet the following basic conditions in order to be granted a visa:

  • Your passport or other form of valid travel document must be valid for three months past the visa expiration date.
  • Your passport or travel document must have been issued within the past 10 years.
  • You must have the necessary means to pay for your stay and return trip. What will be considered as necessary funds will be determined by the Danish diplomatic mission and depends on the length of your stay, and whether you will stay at a hotel or with friends or family. As a general rule, you must have at your disposal approx. DKK 350 per day. If you are staying at a hotel, the amount must be greater, approx. DKK 500 per day.
  • You must hold a travel insurance policy to cover possible expenses in connection with a return for health reasons or death, indispensable medical treatment or acute hospitalisation during your stay. The insurance policy must cover all Schengen countries, and the minimum policy coverage is € 30,000. The insurance policy must be valid for the same period as the visa. The validity of the visa may be shortened if the insurance policy does not cover the entire period.
  • You may not be registered as an undesirable in the Schengen Information System (SIS II).
  • You may not have been deported from Denmark and given an entry ban.
  • You may not be listed on UN or EU sanction lists.

These conditions apply at the time your visa is issued, as well as when you enter and stay in the Schengen region.

If the Immigration Service suspects that you intend to seek permanent or long-term residency in Denmark, or that you may pose threat to national security or public safety, your visa application will be refused.

You can apply for a short-term visa via the Danish diplomatic mission abroad.

Read more at the webpage of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark about where to apply for a short-term visa to Denmark (um.dk).

If you have not been issued a short term visa from a diplomatic mission when entering Denmark, it is possible for you to apply for a short term visa at the border (emergency visa). You must apply at the police at the border. Your application will be processed by the Immigration Service. If you apply at the border, it is a requirement that you have not been able to apply beforehand, and you can be asked to document that your reason for entering is unpredictable and necessary.

You also have the possibility to apply for a residence permit under the Special Act.

There is no requirement for where you must stay if you are staying in Denmark on a short term visa. However, you must continue to meet the conditions for a short term visa stay. Read more about this in the question above.

Any foreign national in Denmark can submit an application for asylum. You can apply for asylum regardless of whether you entered Denmark illegally or have a residence permit or visa.

It is only possible to apply for asylum in Denmark if you are in Denmark. You can also apply for asylum in Denmark at the border, for example if you do not meet the requirements for a visa free stay in Denmark. It is not possible to apply for asylum by enquiring at a Danish representation (embassy or consulate-general).

How you can apply for asylum depends on whether you have a residence permit in Denmark.

If you do not have a residence permit, you can apply for asylum by showing up in person at a police station in Denmark or at the police in Centre Sandholm.

If you already have a residence permit (on other grounds than asylum) in Denmark, you can apply for by showing up in person at the police in the district where you live.

Read more about the possibility to apply for asylum in Denmark (nyidanmark.dk)

If you apply for asylum and you do not already have another residence permit in Denmark, you must live at an asylum center. This apply no matter if you have stayed in Denmark on a visa-free stay or short term visa, until you applied for asylum.

Normally it is not possible to stay with family, friends, a spouse, children or other forms of private accommodation right after you have applied for asylum.

As an asylum seeker, you can apply to the Danish Immigration Service for permission to live with family or friends in a private residence in Denmark.

It is a requirement that you have stayed in Denmark for at least 6 months from when you applied for asylum in order to be allowed to move to a private accommodation.

If you want to move in to your spouse, minor child or parent living in Denmark, you can apply to the Danish Immigration Service for permission to live with privately right after you have been granted residence permit.

The permission to live privately last until you are granted a residence permit or leave Denmark.

Because it is the responsibility of the Immigration Service to ensure that asylum seekers’ living conditions are acceptable, the residence, as well as you and the person you would like to live with, need to meet certain requirements in order to be approved.

Read more about the requirements for residing privately with friends or family (nyidanmark.dk)

Read more about the requirements for residing privately with a spouse (nyidanmark.dk)

If you already have another residence permit in Denmark for example on the grounds of family reunification or as a farm worker, you are allowed to keep living in your current place of residence while your application is being processed.

As an Ukrainian citizen you can stay in Denmark for 90 days on a visa-free stay after your residence permit has expired.

Read more about visa-free stays (nyidanmark.dk)

You can also apply for a residence permit under the Special Act on displaced persons from Ukraine, if you wish to remain in Denmark. Read more under the question above 'Who can obtain a residence permit under the Special Act on displaced persons from Ukraine?'

The Immigration Service have decided to put cases for asylum from Ukrainian citizens on hold. This is done as a result of a decision made by the Refugee Appeals Board’s coordination committee on 24 February 2022 to put the board’s case regarding Ukrainian citizens on hold due to the notifications of acts of war in great parts of the country and the introduction of a military state of emergency.

On 28 April 2022, the Board decided to continue to put the cases on hold, and thus the Immigration Service’s cases continue to be put on hold as well. 

The affected asylum seekers will be notified directly about the cases on hold. Please note that the Refugee Appeals Board’s coordination committee will consider the situation again at their next meeting on 23 June 2022.

If you have been given a deadline to leave Denmark which you cannot meet, you can ask to have your deadline extended.

If you have received a refusal to your application for a residence permit or right of residence on grounds of e.g. work, study or EU-regulations, you must contact The Danish Agency for International Recruitment and Integration (SIRI).

If you have received a refusal to your application for family reunification based on the Danish Aliens Act, you must contact The Danish Immigration Service.

Your deadline can be extended if there are special circumstances which affect your ability to leave Denmark. You need to apply for an extension yourself, and you must be able to document that leaving Denmark within the deadline is not possible.

Contact SIRI through our contact form (nyidanmark.dk)

Contact The Immigration Service through our contact form (nyidanmark.dk)

No, you do not have permission to work in Denmark, when you have been given a deadline for leaving.

As a citizen of Ukraine, you are from a country outside the EU/EEA or Switzerland and therefore need a work permit before you can legally work in Denmark.

You can also apply for a residence permit under the Special Act on displaced persons from Ukraine, if you wish to remain in Denmark and thus have the opportunity to continue working. Read more under the question above 'Who can obtain a residence permit under the Special Act on displaced persons from Ukraine?'

SIRI does, as a rule, not grant residence permits to accompanying family members to an intern.

Ukrainian citizens can, however, under certain circumstances enter Denmark without a visa. Read more under the question above 'Can I stay on a visa-free stay in Denmark?'

You can also apply for a residence permit under the Special Act on displaced persons from Ukraine, if you wish to remain in Denmark. Read more under the question above 'Who can obtain a residence permit under the Special Act on displaced persons from Ukraine?'

The current deadline for having your biometrics recorded has been extended to 4 weeks from the date you submit your application. If you are not able to meet this deadline, you must contact SIRI or the Danish Immigration Service with an explanation of why you have not been able to have your biometrics recorded.

If you are going to have your biometrics recorded outside Denmark, you can find information on where you can have biometrics recorded on the webpage of the Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs here:

Where to apply for a visa or residence permit (um.dk)

Please note that for many locations, you must appear at a Visa Application Center (VFS) and you must book an appointment beforehand.

If you are submitting an application to SIRI in Denmark, you must have your biometrics recorded in one of SIRI’s branch offices. You must book an appointment before appearing in person.

Read more about how to book an appointment in one of SIRI’s branch offices (nyidanmark.dk)

If you are submitting an application to the Danish Immigration Service, you must have your biometrics recorded in the Citizen Service of the Danish Immigration Service. Citizen Service has branch offices several places in Denmark. You must book an appointment before you appear in person.

Read more about the Citizen Service of the Danish Immigration Service and how to book an appointment (nyidanmark.dk)

Asylum seekers will have their biometrics recorded as part of the registration procedure in Center Sandholm.

Foreign nationals who reside in Denmark are usually required to have a passport. However, certain foreign nationals can be issued a passport by the Immigration Service. This mainly applies to refugees.

Therefore, if you are residing in Denmark and have a residence permit on other grounds than asylum, you initially have to contact the Ukrainian Embassy in Copenhagen to be issued a passport or have your passport be extended.

If it is not possible for you to be issued a new Ukrainian passport or have your existing passport be extended due to extraordinary circumstances, you can apply for an alien’s passport.

Read more about applying for a passport (nyidanmark.dk)

Working in Denmark

There are several ways to find a job in Denmark. For example, you can look for jobs on a Danish privately run job site. Below is a list of online job sites that compile all current job openings in Denmark.

Work in Denmark job portal

Jobnet.dk

Sundhedsjobs.dk

Jobindex

Danish job market for highly educated here

STEM Jobs for Ukrainians

For more information go to jobguideukraine.dk.

Use this guide if you have applied for a residence permit under the Special Act and would like to start working before having received your residence permit.

Can I work once I have applied for a residence permit?

You have the right to work in Denmark when you have applied for residence permit under the Special Act and you have had your fingerprints and facial image (biometric features) recorded at the Immigration Service’ Citizen Service.

You do, however, not have the right to work in Denmark if you obviously cannot get a residence permit under the Special Act section 1 or 2. If you are a Ukrainian citizen and you have applied for residence permit under the Special Act and you have had your biometrics features recorded, you have the right to work in Denmark. Read more about the requirements for a residence permit under the question ‘Who can obtain a residence permit under the Special Act on displaced persons from Ukraine?’ here:

Information to persons from Ukraine (nyidanmark.dk)

Does this also apply if I have applied for a residence permit before 22 April?

You have the right to work in Denmark no matter when you applied and had your biometric features recorded. If your biometric features were recorded 22 April 2022 or later, the letter of confirmation you receive at the Citizen Service states the right to work while the application is processed. If your biometric features were recorded before 22 April 2022 the letter of confirmation states that you are not allowed to work before you receive a decision. However, you are still covered by the new rule concerning the right to work while the case is processed.

What should I do if I am offered a job?

The Immigration Service hand over letters of confirmation to everyone who have their biometric features recorded and the Immigration Service cannot assess whether you qualify for a residence permit under the Special Act before we make a decision in the case. If you or your employer are not sure if you obviously cannot get a residence permit under the Special Act section 1 or 2, you should not start working before you get a decision.

If you are offered a job while your case is being processed, you must send the Danish Immigration Service a copy of your employment contract, as it may have an impact on where you will live, should you receive a residence permit.

How do I get paid?

If you want to start working before you have received a residence permit, you must contact the Danish Tax Agency to get a tax card. You can read more on this webpage:

When you are from Ukraine and get a job in Denmark (skat.dk)

Get an introduction on how to set up a business in Denmark as well as information on where you can get help and personal guidance:

How to set up a business in Denmark (virksomhedsguiden.dk)

Travel advice and consular assistance

Yes. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs advises against all travel to the whole of Ukraine due to combat actions in large areas of the country. It is therefore extremely risky to travel and stay in Ukraine.

If you are staying in Ukraine, you should assess your own security situation depending on where in the country you are located. It is your own assessment whether you are safe where you are or whether you should leave. Follow developments in the media and consult with your local contacts.

From February 24, the Ukrainian authorities have imposed a state of military emergency. Among other things, there is a curfew in the evening and at night. The exact times vary from region to region. It is important that you always carry a valid photo ID.

According to Ukrainian law, it is illegal to travel to the Crimea without permission from the Ukrainian authorities. You risk being fined, imprisoned, deported or banned from entering Ukraine.

The Ukrainian border guards are on high alert along the border with Belarus. This means, among other things, that civilians are not allowed to stay in the border area at night and that you must not use small roads.

Always follow the instructions of the local authorities.

Yes. The Embassy in Kyiv reopened on May 2, 2022. Limited consular assistance is provided. The embassy is open for personal contact by appointment. The Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs still has very limited opportunities to advise on the situation in Ukraine and to provide consular assistance due to the current situation. If you have questions or have been in an emergency situation abroad, you can contact the Ministry of Foreign Affairs' Global Watch Center 24/7.

You can also download the Ministry of Foreign Affairs' free app Travel Ready, so you will receive information directly if a crisis occurs in Ukraine during your trip.

It can be difficult and arduous to leave the country.

It is your own assessment as to whether you are safe where you are or if you should relocate or leave the country. You can contact the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark for urgent advice by contacting the Consular Duty Office 24/7 on [email protected] or +45 33 92 04 00.

You can read the travel advice for Ukraine here (in Danish)

Travellers with a permanent residence in Ukraine can travel into Denmark for free with DSB’s international trains that cross the Danish/German border. In connection with travelling into Denmark on the international trains, you can travel for free when showing a Ukrainian passport, driver’s licence or documents proving residence in Ukraine. The free trip applies to one trip on a Standard class ticket.

From 1 July 2022, it is only possible to travel for free with DSB in the international trains that cross the Danish/German border and to travel with those trains to their final destination.

All other trips with DSB will require a valid ticket.

If Ukrainian refugees have a DB Help Ukraine Ticket, this ticket can also be used for a free trip to another destination with DSB as long as the ticket remains valid.

Please note that these are voluntary schemes that the transport companies have initiated. Thus, it is also the transport companies that set the guidelines and scope in the future. For information on the local / specific guidelines, please refer to the relevant transport company.

General covid-19 restrictions no longer apply in Denmark. However, on board airplanes you may be met with requirements regarding covid-19 certificate, and when visiting homes for the elderly, social institutions and hospitals you may be met with requirements regarding face masks.

Please be aware that businesses and private cultural institutions are allowed to make their own requirements regarding face masks, shields, covid-19 Certificates etc. Please comply with such requirements.

See all rules and regulations

No. A new special act for Ukrainian citizens is being prepared. The new special act states:

  • That you do not have to seek asylum in order to receive a residence permit.
  • The special act will cover Ukrainian citizens and those with refugee status in Ukraine, as well as their accompanying close family members and other family members supported in the same household.

The special act ensures that you as a Ukrainian citizen can quickly obtain a temporary residence permit and form the basis for an everyday life with school, education and work in Denmark.

Read about the agreement on the website for the Ministry of Immigration and Integration of Denmark (in Danish)

Yes. People in Ukraine travelling to the EU/Denmark can bring their pets with them. As a result of the Russian invasion of Ukraine, the EU and Denmark are using a special exemption to Regulation 2013/576 which means that people travelling from Ukraine with their pets can bring them to the EU/Denmark, even if the animal does not meet all of the requirements.

As rabies is found in Ukraine, it is important to pay particular attention to dogs, cats and ferrets, as they can be carriers of the rabies virus.

Read more about how you can bring your pet with you to Denmark (foedevarestyrelsen.dk)

The Danish authorities recommend that you keep up-to-date with the current security situation via the local authorities, the news media (e.g. Interfax) and your travel agency. You should always follow the recommendations of the local authorities.

Yes. However, you may be obliged to register your car with the Danish authorities and pay Danish taxes if your stay has a duration of minimum 30 days.

You can read about registration etc. at the Danish Motor Agency:

Questions and answers about foreign vehicles in Denmark - In Danish (motorst.dk)

For citizens in Denmark

Private individuals and public authorities are obliged to apply for permission to fly the Ukrainian flag.

You can apply for permission here (politi.dk).

Yes. Fundraising requires permission to be legal. However, this does not apply to used items of little value such as clothing, which can be collected without permission. It is the value of the individual item that determines whether the collection requires permission from the board.

Examples:

  • Collection of deposit bottles.
  • Collection of used clothing that is not worth much money, or would otherwise be thrown out.

On 2 March 2022, the Danish Fundraising Board decided that applications for the authorisation of fundraising to support Ukraine and its citizens will be prioritised and processed as quickly as possible within the applicable legislation.

When applying for a permit to fundraise, you must either use the Danish Fundraising Board’s digital self service option or the application form below:

You should be aware of the rules on e.g. visas and passports for Ukrainians in relation to travelling through a number of countries and entering Denmark.

You can search for information about the possibility for Ukrainians to enter other countries from the authorities in the respective countries or in the travel guides on the Ministry of Foreign Affairs' website. The Danish Immigration Service cannot help with that. You can read more about Ukrainian citizens' opportunity to enter Denmark on the information page for Ukrainian citizens at nyidanmark.dk.

If you are not a Danish citizen, you should also be aware of the rules on e.g. visa and passport for yourself in relation to the countries that you have considered travelling through.

For more information go to 'New to Denmark' (nyidanmark.dk)

Emergency Management

On The Danish Emergency Management Agency’s website there is general information about shelters etc. in Denmark. However, the vast majority of the information is in Danish. 

DEMA (brs.dk)

There is no current military threat against Denmark. As shelters are to be used to protect the population against the consequences of acts of war in Denmark, there is no current need to prepare public shelters or security shelters.

In crisis situations, the Danish authorities have a range of different channels to communicate to the public through. You can read more about this on the Danish Emergency Management Agency's website.

Note that currently the Russian invasion in Ukraine poses no military threat to Denmark.

Businesses

You can find an interactive sanctions map on the EU website.

The information is updated on an ongoing basis. It is always the responsibility of companies themselves to comply with sanctions at all times and, where appropriate, seek legal advice.

Companies that conduct business in Russia should already be looking at whether there is an alternative export or sourcing market to Russia, given that there is a high risk that Russia could shortly be hit with tough western sanctions that could very negatively affect trade between Denmark and Russia, and result in loss of revenue or export orders.

The Trade Council is ready to help your company identify new suppliers in other markets and restructure your supply chains.

Contact The Trade Council’s Global Response Team [email protected] or use the contact form here.

The Trade Council is ready to help your company access other export markets, identify new distributors, prepare market analyses, etc.

Contact The Trade Council’s Global Response Team [email protected] or use the contact form here.

Whether or not your company’s export of goods and services to Russia are subject to the sanctions is based on a specific assessment. It is always the company’s own responsibility to comply with the sanctions in force at all times, and to seek any legal assistance.

In some cases, the authorities may provide guidance on the sanctions. You can find an overview of the qualified authorities here (um.dk).

Please visit the Danish Business Authority’s website eksportkontrol.dk for questions about sanctions in relation to export.

Goods and trade

Wheat, corn, barley as well as seeds, oil and flour from sunflowers.

Global food prices have reached the highest level ever. The global food price index, which reflects the price development of the 95 most traded agricultural commodities on the commodity exchanges, has risen 7 percentage points since the new year, and more than 20 percentage points last year.

Yes. Municipalities offering subsidies for the care of one’s own child may, pursuant to the act on special care and education provisions for displaced children and young people from Ukraine, decide to grant a subsidy for the care of one’s own children to parents who request this and who have residence pursuant to the act on temporary residence permits for persons displaced from Ukraine, subject to the conditions stipulated below.

Parents from Ukraine must meet the conditions to receive a subsidy for the care of their own children which are set out in Section 87 of the Day Care Act, with the exception of the requirement to possess sufficient Danish language skills and the requirement to have been resident in

Denmark for seven out of the previous eight years.

Ukraine and Russia produce 31 percent of the global wheat market. Russia's invasion of Ukraine will therefore have an impact on all foods, including wheat. The crisis means that the prices of selected goods, primarily on bread and corn products, are likely to rise. It is too early to say how much prices will rise and when prices will drop again.

It is important to emphasize that there will be no shortage of food in the supermarkets in Denmark, as the country has strong supply chains and produces a lot itself.

Together with the EU, which has a robust food and agriculture sector, Denmark is keeping a close eye on the development of the food sectors. Denmark works closely with close partners and with international organizations in relation to global developments in the food markets.

Imports from the Russian-controlled / occupied territories of Ukraine - Luhansk and Donetsk as well as from Crimea and Sevastopol - are banned.

A general import ban on goods from Russia has not been applied, however, imports of certain luxury goods have been banned.

Imported goods must comply with EU rules.

For more information, go to The Danish Veterinary and Food Administration.

Health

Yes. The Danish Health Authority is following the developments in Ukraine in close national and international cooperation. In connection with the invasion of Ukraine, the Radiation Protection Unit of the Danish Health Authority is following the developments closely. This is done in cooperation with the Danish Emergency Management Agency (DEMA), who keep themselves up to date about the situation at the four nuclear power plants in operation in Ukraine, along with the decommissioned nuclear power plant in Chernobyl.

DEMA continuously monitor radiation levels in Denmark in order to detect increased radiation from airborne radioactive substances which may originate from incidents or accidents in locations such as nuclear power plants.

Radiation levels in Denmark are measured at 11 permanent monitoring stations. On the basis of DEMA’s monitoring of radiation levels and forecasts of the spread of radioactive substances, the Danish Health Authority prepares health advice.

To date, no evidence of emissions from nuclear power plants in Ukraine or regional spread of radioactive substances from the area around the decommissioned power plant in Chernobyl has been detected.

The Ukrainian authorities are openly providing information to the public about the safety of the nuclear power plants in Ukrainian territory.

The Danish Health Authority also follows the cooperation on the exchange of information in the EU, the International Atomic Energy Agency, and with other Nordic authorities.

A number of authorities are working together to protect the population, animals and the environment in the event of an incident that could spread radioactive materials. The descriptions below of the regulatory tasks in the case of nuclear incidents is not exhaustive, as more or fewer authorities may be involved depending on the actual situation, just as the tasks may be different from those indicated.

  • The Danish Emergency Management Agency
    DEMA lead operational preparedness. Their tasks include informing the authorities, population and press about the situation of a nuclear include, measuring the levels of radiation in Denmark and Greenland, and conducting calculations and forecasts for the spread of radioactive substances. DEMA store the Danish stock of iodine tablets. Read more at the Danish Emergency Management Agency’s website.
  • The Danish Health Authority
    The Danish Health Authority is responsible for anti-radiation precautions. Their tasks include communication and advice on radiation protection measures for the authorities, population and press. The Danish Health Authority prepares recommendations on the use of iodine tablets. Read more about the Danish Health Authority’s preparedness.
  • Danish Veterinary and Food Administration
    The Danish Veterinary and Food Administration is responsible for food safety. Their tasks include communication to the population and the press about possible restrictions on the import of food, if there’s a chance of it being contaminated with radioactive particles. Read more on the Danish Veterinary and Food Administration’s website.

There is no more radioactive iodine in the destroyed Chernobyl plant. Any damage to the destroyed – now sealed – plant will only have local consequences with the spread of the remaining radioactive substances, primarily Caesium-137.

The consumption of iodine tablets is only appropriate in direct connection with accidents or leaks at nuclear power plants close to Denmark, i.e. within a radius of 100-200 km.

Non-radioactive iodine must be ingested in the correct quantities and at the right time in relation to the exposure to radioactive iodine for it to have the desired preventative effect.

Iodine tablets should only be taken at the instruction of the authorities, and not on your own initiative.

It is not appropriate to use supplements containing iodine with a view to having protection in the event of an incident or accident at a nuclear power plant. The iodine content is so low that the supplements would have no effect at all. Supplements are therefore not appropriate as a substitute for iodine tablets.

Yes. The Danish Refugee Council offers Ukrainians in Denmark a telephone conversation with a Ukrainian-speaking professional. The focus is on personal reactions, and especially how to support children in the special situation they are in. It is possible to arrange 1-3 sessions on the phone as well as the opportunity to meet face to face or a course depending on needs, geography, etc.

Tel. (+45) 33 73 53 14

Hotline opening hours:
Monday – Friday: 9-10 am and 5-6 pm

www.drc.ngo

Do Ukrainians refugees in Denmark have the right to treatment in the health care system?

When you have a residence permit and residence in Denmark, you are entitled to free treatment in some areas of the public health service.

Read more about your rights in this leaflet, which is available in Danish, English, Ukrainian and Russian:

You and your health - Booklet - The Danish Health Authority

Daycare

Displaced persons from Ukraine with residence pursuant to the special act on temporary residence permits are entitled to put their children in day care. The municipality shall allocate space to children at a day-care centre in accordance with the applicable rules in the Danish Day Care Act when parents sign their child up for a space.

Displaced persons from Ukraine with residence pursuant to the special act on temporary residence permits are entitled to put their children in day care. The municipality shall allocate space to children at a day-care centre in accordance with the applicable rules in the Danish Day Care Act when parents sign their child up for a space.

The rules of the Day Care Act on subsidies and parental contributions apply for displaced children from Ukraine who are enroled in a day care centre.

Displaced children from Ukraine cannot be enroled without a payment requirement.

However, parents may be entitled to for a financial daycare subsidy (fripladstilskud), which may reduce or entirely cover the parental contribution, provided the parents meet the conditions in the Day Care Act with regards to this.

Yes. Municipalities offering subsidies for the care of one’s own child may, pursuant to the act on special care and education provisions for displaced children and young people from Ukraine, decide to grant a subsidy for the care of one’s own children to parents who request this and who have residence pursuant to the act on temporary residence permits for persons displaced from Ukraine, subject to the conditions stipulated below.

Parents from Ukraine must meet the conditions to receive a subsidy for the care of their own children which are set out in Section 87 of the Day Care Act, with the exception of the requirement to possess sufficient Danish language skills and the requirement to have been resident in Denmark for seven out of the previous eight years.

Yes. The act on special care and education provisions for displaced children and young people from Ukraine allows the municipalities to grant permission for Ukrainian to be spoken in private day-care schemes at which an agreement has been entered into regarding the care of children who have residence pursuant to the act on temporary residence permits for persons displaced from Ukraine.

The municipality has the option to grant subsidies for private care for use in a private day-care scheme where Ukrainian is spoken to a parent group other than the one with which the municipality may have established for private childcare subsidies under the Day Care Act.

This means that the municipality can give parents from Ukraine or other persons the option to establish a private day-care scheme at which displaced parents with children who have residence pursuant to the special act can receive daycare services for their children if they so wish.

An administrative authority must ensure that it is able to understand and be understood by foreigners in relation to matters within the authority's area of responsibility. Depending on the circumstances, the authority must, if necessary, make interpretation and translation assistance available to the person concerned. This applies in general and not only where special legislation or an international convention requires interpreting assistance.

Language evaluation is a tool that the educational personnel can use in the educational work with children’s language development.

All children who are approximately three years old and attend a day-care facility must receive a language evaluation if there are linguistic, behavioural or other conditions that give rise to presuming that the child may need language stimulation.

All children who are approximately three years old, who do not attend a day-care facility, must receive a language evaluation. On the basis of the language evaluation, it will be assessed whether the child needs language stimulation.

Elementary School

Yes. There is the possibility of home schooling. This means, that the parents or a teacher provide education for children of the compulsory school age. Before the home schooling begins, the parents must notify the municipality in writing of their address.

The municipality supervises home education. Every year, the municipality can hold exams in Danish, arithmetic / mathematics, English, history / social studies and science subjects to ensure that the teaching corresponds with what is generally required in primary and lower secondary school. It cannot be required by the municipality that the tests be held in a language other than Danish.

The subject Danish must be taught in Danish.

Upper secondary, higher and special education

It is up to the management of the individual upper-secondary institution to assess whether a displaced person from Ukraine can be admitted to a Danish programme of upper-secondary study on the basis of the applicant’s academic background.

Students can be enroled midway during a programme of upper-secondary education or at the start of term, for example in school year 2023/24:

If the student is enrolled during the school year:

Applicants can be admitted on the basis of a concrete assessment by the management of the institution which considers the ability of the person concerned to attain credits/qualifications.
The legal basis for this is Section 15 of the Act on General Upper Secondary Education.

If the student is enrolled at the start of term, e.g. at the beginning of school year 2023/24:

Applicants are entitled to enrol in an upper secondary programme if the applicant’s schooling is equivalent to the level held upon completion of year nine or ten in the Danish compulsory education system as per the act on the assessment of qualifications obtained abroad, etc.

Applicants do not need to meet the conditions relating to the sitting of compulsory education tests and examinations or a centrally set entrance exam, cf. the act on upper secondary education, however they must meet the other admission requirements through the adaptations that result from their particular schooling background.

It is up to the head of the institution to assess whether the applicant’s general academic abilities are equivalent to those of other eligible applicants, and if the personal and social attributes of the applicant are such that it would be realistic for the individual concerned to be able to complete the programme.

The management of the institution shall determine this on the basis of a concrete assessment and a test if necessary. The legal basis for this is Section 24 of the executive order on enrolments.

Danish tuition for newly arrived foreigners is offered in accordance with the Act on Danish education for adult foreigners and others (Danish Education Act) under the Ministry of Immigration and Integration Affairs. Newly arrived people under the age of 18, who have completed primary school will, as a starting point, be offered instruction in Danish as a second language in a youth environment in accordance with the Act on Secondary Schools.

Danish lessons are also offered under the auspices of general adult education (AVU), preparatory adult education (FVU) and AMU.

The teaching of Danish as a second language under the auspices of AVU, FVU and AMU takes place as part of a general or vocational upskilling, and both AVU, FVU-Danish and AMU have a broad target group consisting of both employed and unemployed, people of Danish descent and immigrants / descendants who speak Danish.

The language course is an offer that in a broad sense must support a flexible labor market by giving the unskilled and short-educated part of the population the opportunity to continuously acquire the qualifications and competencies that are in demand in the labor market and in society.

In addition, vocational schools have the right to offer independent entrance courses in Danish, Danish as a second language and mathematics at the level of the folkeskole's 9th grade tests for adults from the age of 25, who wish to apply for a vocational education.

For further information on Danish language tuition for newly arrived adult foreigners, please contact your local municipality or go to Ministry of Children and Education (uvm.dk)

It is the municipality of residence that must assess whether the young person is in the target group for STU and otherwise meets the conditions for admission.

For more information please go to:

Special needs education for adults (borger.dk)

Yes, displaced persons from Ukraine can be enroled in vocational training programmes if they meet the general admission requirements for the programme in question.

The general requirement for this is typically a minimum grade average of 2.0 in Danish or mathematics in the compulsory education leaving exam (year 9/10) or an equivalent result in an equivalent test, and having been assessed as capable/suitable to complete the programme of education or having an education agreement with the training provider.

Displaced persons from Ukraine who have completed a programme of study in Ukrainian, and passed an exam in the subject at a level which corresponds to the Danish compulsory education leaving exam or year-ten exams, do not need to meet the Danish language entrance requirement. It is therefore not a requirement for admission that the applicant be a native speaker of Danish. However, it is a prerequisite for admission that applicants have sufficient Danish language skills to complete the programme if the language of instruction is Danish.

Applicants who have two years of relevant experience in relation to the programme of study they have applied to are exempt from the qualification requirement.

It is up to each individual vocational college to assess whether an applicant can be admitted on the basis of a qualification obtained abroad, and whether or not the applicant masters the Danish language to the extent necessary to complete the programme. If a college chooses to offer instruction in a language other than Danish, then they shall instead assess whether the applicant can complete the programme in the relevant language of instruction. See also the FAQ on the provision of education and training in languages other than Danish.

Schools can contact the Ministry of Higher Education and Science’s hotline for advice on how to assess qualifications obtained abroad. See

Hotline for educational institutions — Ministry of Higher Education and Science (ufm.dk)

Applicants who do not meet the admission requirements can be admitted by means of an entrance exam and interview at the vocational college to which they are applying.

Basis of residence will factor in to whether or not self-payment can be required in order to complete the programme.

Ukrainian refugees, who have a residence permit under the Special Act, are included in the basis for calculating state subsidies for education on the same terms as other students and apprentices in a vocational education. This means, among other things, that there is no requirement for self-payment, and that the persons in question are entitled to school education benefit and will be covered by the rules on salary reimbursement during training.

Yes, displaced young persons from Ukraine have access to preparatory basic education and training if their municipality of residence considers the person to be in the target group for this and provided that other admission conditions are also met. Generally, the young person must be under 25 years of age and they must not have completed a programme of upper secondary education or be in stable employment.

There are no language requirements for FGU. If the language of instruction is Danish, the student will be expected to have an intelligible and functional level of everyday speech such that there is no need for an interpreter in their everyday life. Displaced young persons from

Ukraine will therefore generally need proper Danish language instruction before going on to enrol in preparatory basic education and training.

Access to AMU programmes is contingent upon having residence (CPR registration) or employment in Denmark. Adults who have been granted a residence permit under the act on temporary residence permits for persons displaced from Ukraine thus have access to adult vocational training.

Generally, AMU programmes are held in Danish, however it is possible for AMU programmes to be delivered in languages other than Danish if this is requested and the provider has teaching qualifications.

There are no concrete language requirements for participation on the majority of AMU programmes, and therefore it is always up to the AMU provider to undertake an individual assessment as to whether the participant can receive the necessary benefit from the programme.

However, potential participants must have the necessary language skills to complete the programme with a satisfactory result. The AMU provider may therefore require the participant to undertake a language test prior to the point at which the programme commences.

However, there are specific language requirements for participation in special courses for bilingual students. Moreover, specific Danish language skills are also recommended on certain courses for reasons of security as well as language requirements set by other authorities.

After School Care

Contact the municipality in which you live for more information.

The Ministry of Children and Education has information available in Danish under ‘fritidstilbud’:

Ministry of Children and Education (uvm.dk)

Shipping

There is no general ban on Russian ships entering Danish ports or waters.

Companies servicing Russian ships are encouraged to stay informed with the EU’s list of sanctions, as there may be specific Russian ships or operators subject to sanctions.

Due to seafarer employment law, wages can be paid in cash. The Danish Maritime Authority can be contacted for more information.

The Danish Maritime Authority: [email protected] / +45 71 19 60 00.